Father Mbaka says he is going to suffer following his transfer to another Parish

Rev. Fr. Ejike Mbaka, yesterday Jan. 30th bowed out of Christ the King Parish, GRA, Enugu, which he’d presided over as parish priest for 20 years. On his way to his new presiding parish, Our lady Parish, Emene, in Enugu, over 30 lorries accom­panied by thousands of his faithful followers escorted him in a motorcade to a new church where he will be an assistant parish priest.
The transfer of reverend fathers is not an issue in the catholic church as it is a routine exercise that is done every once in a while but Fr. Mbaka’s transfer became an issue because the people saw it as a measure for his recent prophecies especially that of December 31st 2014, when he predicted that former President Goodluck Jonathan would be defeated in the 2015 elections. This has however been dismissed by the church.
His transfer as a parish priest to a resident priest, in which he will serve under another priest, has also caused a stir among people because he has been with the catholic church for years so it is only normal to make him the parish priest and not an assistant.
While handing over formally to his successor yesterday, Mbaka said:
“I know we are going to suffer; between now and few months to come, I am going to suffer; I am going to suffer because I have no place to lay my head; I am going to suffer because I have no place to keep the Ministry’s assets; I know I am going to suffer; fortunate going to suffer because I have no ly it’s going to happen in the month of Lent; so I am going to use my exit here to observe the Lent. But Jesus said it to His apostles in John 16:20, ‘You will be sorrowful and the world will be rejoicing but very soon I will turn your sorrows to joy.’ So I am waiting for that moment because for now I know we are going to suffer. The Adoration Ministry is passing through suffering right now; even though I have accepted it as the will of God; it is the will of God through suffering; it is a mega suffering. But however, the grace of God will carry us all; even though some of you may pray that God should remove this thorn from us, the scripture says ‘His grace is sufficient for us; for its even in your weakness that the power of God is demonstrated. So we are moving but don’t forget the scriptures, ‘my brothers they make me keeper of vineyards, my own vineyard I keepeth not. All these while we have been keeping vineyards, building for Christ The King Parish…Bishop Gbuji asked them, how much …but because I don’t want to disclose my charity, they can’t keep that account. How many trailer loads of cement came here? All the monies I made from my cassette and other private crusades all of them were used to build this church. We cannot quantify it but let God be glorified.”
“It is the will of God, and when the will of God either permissive or however, happens, nobody should question it. All you have today is Amen; so to the will of God Fr. Mbaka has said Amen”.
He said he’s accepting the decision of the church leadership with absolute obedience, adding that nobody should see him as an obstinate priest. He also assured them that the parish would not collapse due to his exit, and urged the members to treat his successor, Rev. Fr. Theodore Ozoamalu, well, and to assist him in any way he needs help and not allow him to cry.
“Don’t starve him; don’t allow him to suffer; in my own time I didn’t need your help because God blessed me in my own unique way and I am happy. God will keep the parish because we have fought the good fight; I am not regretting anything and the highest gift God has given here is his Holy Spirit who assisted me up till now” he said.

Source: TheSun

Bioethics Q-and-A: End of Life Decision Making: What Should Catholics Do?

Some might find it difficult or even repugnant to initiate a forthright conversation with a loved one about treatment plans at the end of life. I urge you to overcome this resistance.

You check into a hospital for a routine procedure. They ask you if you have a living will. You say no. They slide a form in front of you with simplistic questions such as: Do you want to be resuscitated if you go into cardiac arrest? Do you want mechanical ventilation if you are unable to breath? Do you want nutrients and fluids supplied to your body if you’re unconscious?
Your gut tells you the questions are superficial. If CPR could revive you and you could live decently for a while longer, yes, you’d want it. If you’d die anyway an hour later, then no. If ventilation was a temporary measure to help you overcome an acute condition, yes. If you were permanently unconscious and never able to breathe again on our own, then perhaps no. And food and water? Of course you want to be fed. What’s the alternative, starvation?
You don’t get much help from the check-in clerk. And hospital healthcare managers give you ideologically-laden advice such as “think about your values…and what you feel would make your life not worth living” (from the
Mayo Clinic website). “Life not worth living!?,” you ask, “Where does that idea come from? Not from Catholic faith.”
But you recall that your Aunt Agatha didn’t have an Advance Directive and she was subjected to aggressive and obviously-futile treatments at the end of her life and suffered unnecessarily. You’re pretty sure that if she’d been asked she’d have said: “Enough’s enough. Let me go to God!” But she was unconscious. You fear that if you don’t fill out the form, something like this might happen to you. What should you do?
Advice for Catholics: If you can avoid using
Living Wills and POLST ( MOST ) forms, by all means do so. Their simplistic check-box format poses unacceptable risks from both the perspective of good medical decision-making and good ethical decision-making. They risk binding the hands of medical professionals to non-treatment decisions that are not in the best interests of patients.
But this does not mean that Catholics should be unprepared for end-of-life crises. I recommend that all Catholics who are able should do the following three things:
First , execute in writing a Health Care Power of Attorney ( HCPA) assigning a proxy decision maker—sometimes called a “surrogate”—to act as your healthcare agent in the event that you become incapable of making informed decisions. You can do this yourself without costly legal fees. Just make sure that your
HCPA is adequately specific and your signature is validly witnessed. Here are a few things you might include.
Invest your proxy with full authority to make healthcare decisions on your behalf, including but not limited to the power to:
(1) consent to, or refuse, or withdraw consent to, any type of medical care, treatment, surgical procedure, diagnostic procedure, medication and the use of mechanical or other procedures that affect any bodily function, including, in appropriate circumstances, life-sustaining procedures. [*Note: this power does not extend to the refusing of properly “ordinary means” of care, defined in Catholic teaching as forms of care or treatment that promise a “reasonable hope of benefit” and are “not excessively burdensome.” The
Catholic Church teaches that the administration of food and water is always ordinary care unless and until one’s body no longer can assimilate them, at which time their administration becomes futile and is no longer obligatory];
(2) request, receive, and review any information regarding your physical or mental health, including but not limited to medical, hospital and other records; and to consent to or authorize the use and disclosure of such information;
(3) employ and discharge your health care providers;
(4) authorize your admission to or discharge (including transfer to another facility) from any hospital, hospice, nursing home, assisted living facility or other medical care facility;
(5) authorize that you be discharged from a medical facility and be brought home and cared for at home;
(6) take any lawful actions necessary to carry out these decisions.
You may also want to state that the authority of your agent is subject to no limitation except the law of God, the authoritative teaching of the Catholic Church, and your agent’s own conscience.
Second, ensure that your proxy not only is willing to direct all relevant medical decisions in accord with Catholic faith and morals, but understands what doing so means. Frequently the limiting factor in legal disputes over end-of-life decisions comes down to uncertainty of the wishes of the patient. Remove all uncertainty. Make your wishes known both orally and in writing as clearly as possible to your proxy and to other loved ones.
If you are uncertain about Church teaching on end-of-life decision-making, speak to your parish priest, or an informed Catholic medical professional, or contact trustworthy groups like the
Catholic Medical Association, or your diocesan moral theologian, or, if nothing else is available, directly contact your local bishop.
Third , in the event that you or your proxy are faced with a situation in which the judgment of a hospital ethics committee or other hospital decision makers seems to conflict with your faith or morals, don’t be afraid to mount a legal challenge in court. If you are reticent because of the cost of legal representation, consult with a reliable Christian advocacy ministry such as Alliance Defending Freedom,
Christian Legal Society , and American Center for Law and Justice. You might even contact one of the 50 state affiliates of National Right to Life .
Some might find it difficult or even repugnant to initiate a forthright conversation with a loved one about treatment plans at the end of life. I urge you to overcome this resistance. Because a large majority of medical resources in U.S. healthcare are consumed on end-of-life treatments for the elderly, secular medicine, fueled by Obamacare, and with the support of the medical insurance industry, is investing enormous energy in publicizing and distributing secular tools for end-of-life decision making. The tools are invariably skewed in the direction of refusal of life sustaining treatments. Although flagrant examples of aggressive overtreatment still exist, U.S. healthcare is travelling rapidly and ineluctably in the direction of a culture of refusal. Without conscientious advance planning, some will find the pressure to check the “refusal” box on these documents hard to resist.

Christian Brugger is Senior Fellow of Ethics at the Culture of Life Foundation in Washington, DC, and Cardinal Stafford Professor of Moral Theology at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver.
[Readers may send questions regarding bioethics to zenitbioethics{at}gmail.com. The text should include your initials, your city and state, province or country. The fellows at the Culture of Life Foundation will answer a select number of the questions that arrive.]

Pope’s Morning Homily: Don’t Let Sin Turn Into Corruption

During Mass at Casa Santa Marta, Francis Stresses ‘Ugliest Thing’ Is He Who Thinks He Has ‘No Need for Forgiveness’




Even if one sins often, whenever one returns to God seeking forgiveness, he never needs to doubt he will be forgiven.
Pope Francis made this point during his daily morning Mass at Casa Santa Marta this morning, as he distinguished sinners from the corrupt, who “no longer see the need to be forgiven” and “don’t feel they need God,” reported Vatican Radio.
The Pontiff drew his inspiration from today’s first reading, which raccounted the story of David and Bathsheba. After David seduced Bathsheba, he found out that she was pregnant, and he hatched a plot to cover-up his adultery, including doing everything in his power to arrange the death of Basheba’s husband, a loyal man, by having him killed in battle and making it look like an accident.
“David is a saint, but also a sinner,” the Pope stressed, who fell on account of lust, but who God still loves him very much.
However, he pointed, we observe that when he arranges this murder, we see “a moment through which we all can pass in our life: it is the passage from sin to corruption.”
Corruption, the Pope acknowledged, “is a very easy sin for all of us who have some power, whether it be ecclesiastical, religious, economic, political… Because the devil makes us feel certain: ‘I can do it.’”
The Holy Father went on to warn against this moment in which the “attitude of sin, or a moment where our situation is so secure and we see well and we have so much power’ that sin ‘stops’ and becomes ‘corruption.’”
“One of the ugliest things” about corruption, the Pontiff underscored, is that the one who becomes corrupt thinks he has “no need for forgiveness.”
“Today, let us offer a prayer for the Church, beginning with ourselves, for the Pope, for the Bishops, for the priests, for consecrated men and women, for the lay faithful: ‘Lord, save us, save us from corruption.”

Pope Francis concluded, saying, “We are sinners, yes, O Lord, all of us, but [let us] never [become] corrupt!’ Let us ask for this grace.”

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Cull from a lighthouse 

Kenyan mothers name newborns after Pope Francis

Following the visit of Pope Francis to Kenya, 13 babies born yesterday, November 26, at Kakamega County Referral Hospital, were named after him. Some of the names includes Francisca, Francis, Pope Devin, Pope Francis, Fransisco, Pope Wambua.
According to Standard Digital News, the hospital maternity ward has recorded 13 newborns since the Pope’s arrival. The happy mothers said they had decided to name their babies after the Pope to draw from the character of the Catholic Pontif Immaculate Katiechi delivered her baby boy at 1 am and immediately named the child Pope Devin, but said was considering registering the baby as Pope Francis.

Another baby boy was delivered at Nakuru Nursing Home a few hours after the Pope’s arrival was also named Francis. Linda Tanui, the baby’s mother, said her sister had suggested that the newborn be named after the Pope.
A nun belonging to a Catholic family from Mogotio in Baringo County had suggested that the new member be named Fransisco Mario, which is the other name of the Pontiff. Alice Ng’etich, the grandmother of the newborn, said the coincidence is a sign of God’s love for the family, which is still recovering from the loss of one of her children.
At Coast General Hospital, 29 babies were born after midnight and a few mothers named their children after the Pope. Mercy Wambua, a resident of Tudor, named her baby Pope Wambua. Another mother Betty Murende, who is a devoted Catholic, named her daughter Francisca out of respect for the visiting Pope.